Merry Christmas Everybody!!

Merry Christmas everyone.

I know it’s been a while since I last posted. I’ve been busy being, and loving being a mum!! 😀

Sadly on Sunday Seb’s cold worsened and he was admitted to hospital, and we’ve been here ever since. But still, I’d rather he get well and come home safe and sound than rush home to spend Christmas at home (although I am devastated that my first Christmas as a mum is being spent in a hospital bay).

Andrew has been a star, looking after the dogs, and prepping loads of food to make sure I stay as healthy as possible. I’m not making the same mistake as I did when Seb was born!!

As a breast feeding mum the hospital is providing me with food. They have a gluten free menu, and a dairy free menu… Frustratingly, the gluten free menu only had options such as ‘with gluten free bread’ or ‘gluten free dumplings’ etc… Plus everything had legumes and nightshades.

And the dairy free menu was packed with gluten… Therefore, only one meal was both gluten and dairy free… So for Monday – Thursday I had a banana for breakfast, and for both lunch and dinner I had tuna salad (minus the boiled egg and tomatoes…). Not exactly nutrient dense, or very varied! Plus, although tuna is a healthy option, it is a fish that should be consumed in moderation due to its possible mercury content.

Breakfast choices were cereal or toast… Cheap to feed the masses, yes. Nutrient dense… No. Especially lacking in valuable nutrients for healing, and very much lacking in choice for people with dairy and gluten sensitivities….

Thankfully, Andrew brought me a selection of nutrient dense meals 3 times a day, including fish, grass fed beef, organ meat, oysters and plenty (nay, copious) amounts of vegetables.

Thankfully I was there to support and feed my baby, not recover from an illness or surgery. But still, the quality of my milk is directly dependent on the nutrition I consume, therefore my baby needed better menu choices for me on the menu. And thankfully I have an understanding of good nutrition, and a partner willing to do the cooking and leg work for me to get it. But other people in the hospital aren’t that lucky, and they still need the nutritional support to heal.

Since learning what I have about nutrition, and seeing menu choices in hospitals both that I have worked at, and been a patient at, I feel it is an enormously important task to encourage and create change in the food that is served to people who are trying to heal and get out of hospital, whether they are people without disease merely having an elective ankle operation, or an elderly immunosuppressed patient.

The importance of food, and it’s healing properties NEEDS to be pushed more in hospitals. The emphasis is so heavily on getting patients out of hospital, to receive community based care back in their own home (which I totally agree with for a large proportion of cases), yet we provide nutrient deficient fuel for their bodies when they most need quality. Of course there is a cost issue (which will be a huge part), but the other issue is a complete lack of understanding and knowledge around the importance of nutrition…

This needs to be redressed.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/4e7/68789388/files/2014/12/img_3662.jpg

Advertisements